One reason I hate iTunes.

I’ve always hated iTunes. It’s a huge pile of bloatware and it’s slow as poo. It’s like 100 mb or more for an mp3 player. I remember winamp playing mp3s when it was a 500k download. Anyway.

I keep all my music on a Linux machine running samba. This way it’s available to every machine in the house. When I had Winamp on all my machines this was wonderful. But now that I’m forced into iTunes (thanks to having an iPhone), it turns out to be a major pain. In iTunes I unchecked the box for “let iTunes keep my libary organized” to prevent it from copying the entire library to each computer’s local disk. Initially adding my library of ~4000 tracks to iTunes takes over an hour (100 mbit wire) – it would take about 5 minutes in Winamp, even reading the ID3 tags for each track as it was added (rather than lazily as the song was played).

But the thing that iTunes does that is so annoying it prompted me to write this whiny rant is:

iTunes "Song Not Found"
iTunes 'Song Not Found'

If, for some reason, my M: drive (where the Samba share is mapped) is not connected when iTunes starts, every song in the library gets this “!” exclamation point of doom. If I attempt to play any of these tracks, I am given the option to locate the file. Nice in theory, but locating all 4000 tracks isn’t realistic. If I quit iTunes, reconnect the M: drive, and reopen iTunes, the ! persists. The only solution I’ve found to this is deleting the entire library from iTunes and re-adding it, which as I said, takes an extremely long time.

I have other reasons for hating iTunes, this is a blog, not a book.

Long email signatures amuse me.

Putting a glossary in your emails is a new one for me. Not really a bad idea if you deal with lots of industry-specific terminology and lots of non-industry people.


From: Clickatell SC [noreply@clickatell.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 12, 2010 1:04 AM
To: Evan D. Hoffman
Subject: Clickatell System Alert

Dear Clickatell Client,

(Blah Blah Blah)

Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Email:
support@clickatell.com

Phone:
+27 21 910 7700 (South Africa)
+1 650 641 0011 (US)
+44 20 7060 0212 (UK)
+61 290 371 951 (Australia)

--
Clickatell

http://www.clickatell.com

Our Vision
Connecting the world through any message, anywhere.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Terminology:

-Mobile originated (MO): A message sent (originating) from a mobile handset to an application via Clickatell.

-Mobile terminated (MT): A message sent from an application to (terminating on) a mobile handset via Clickatell.

-Premium rated message (MO): A mobile user is charged a premium for the message that they send to a particular short or long code. This service is not available in all regions; please contact an Account Manager for more information.

-Revenue share: This refers to the portion of the premium charge associated with a premium rated message, which is passed on to the content provider.

-Content provider: This is the Clickatell customer who is offering one or more services that are usually premium rated SMS system.

-Customer: A registered Clickatell customer utilising the Clickatell API for message delivery and receipt.

-Sender ID: The “from” address that appears on the user’s handset. This is also known as the message originator or source address. A Sender ID must be registered within your account and approved by us before it may be used.

-Destination address: The mobile number/MSISDN of the handset to which the message must be delivered. The number should be in international number format, e.g. country code + local mobile number, excluding the leading zero (0).

-Source address: The Sender ID or From address of the SMS.

-Short code: A short number which is common across all the operators for a specific region.

-Subscriber: The mobile network subscriber who owns the mobile number (MSISDN) which will send or receive SMSs, or be billed for premium rated services.

-Upstream gateway: A network operator, third party or our own short message service centre (SMSC).

Facebook for iPhone – “Places” hangs on “Locating you…”

I decided to see how “Places” stacked up with Foursquare. I reactivated my Facebook account and reinstalled the iPhone app. Went to “Places” and clicked “Check In,” and… nothing. It mentioned something about turning on Location Services. I know I already have that enabled because other apps are using it without problem. Turns out you need to enable Location Services explicitly:

First, go to the Settings app and select General:

Settings -> General
Settings -> General

Select Location Services:

Location Services
Location Services

Make sure Facebook is enabled (On) if you want to use Places. If you want to disable Places, make sure this is set to Off.

Turn Facebook "On"
Make sure Facebook is 'On' to use Facebook Places.

Facebook for iPhone – "Places" hangs on "Locating you…"

I decided to see how “Places” stacked up with Foursquare. I reactivated my Facebook account and reinstalled the iPhone app. Went to “Places” and clicked “Check In,” and… nothing. It mentioned something about turning on Location Services. I know I already have that enabled because other apps are using it without problem. Turns out you need to enable Location Services explicitly:

First, go to the Settings app and select General:

Settings -> General
Settings -> General

Select Location Services:

Location Services
Location Services

Make sure Facebook is enabled (On) if you want to use Places. If you want to disable Places, make sure this is set to Off.

Turn Facebook "On"
Make sure Facebook is 'On' to use Facebook Places.

Converting Exchange 2003 conference rooms to Exchange 2010

I’m wrapping up moving mailboxes to Exchange 2010. The last ones to be moved (except for BlackBerry users… thanks BES) are the conference rooms. So the first step was to move them using the Local Move tool, which was pretty simple. But I don’t want them in 2010 as user mailboxes if they can be designated as “rooms,” which they can. So here’s how I’m doing it:

Identify the mailboxes to be moved

Once you figure out the syntax for the “-Filter” flag to get-mailbox, this is easy

[PS] C:\Windows\system32>get-mailbox -filter { (RecipientTypeDetails -eq "UserMailbox") -and ( DisplayName -like "*conference*") }

Name                      Alias                ServerName       ProhibitSendQuota
----                      -----                ----------       -----------------
Conference Room2          ConferenceRoom2      exch2010be1      unlimited
Production Conference ... productionconf       exch2010be1      unlimited
Conference Room 1         conference1          exch2010be1      unlimited
L&D Conference Room       ldconference         exch2010be1      unlimited
Tech Conference Room      techconference       exch2010be1      unlimited
Client Services Confer... csconference         exch2010be1      unlimited
Suite 202 Conference Room 202conf              exch2010be1      unlimited

Convert them to rooms

As Microsoft says in this story about converting mailboxes to rooms, this can only be done via Exchange Management Shell (not EMC), so just pipe the output from the previous command to Set-Mailbox -Type Room:

[PS] C:\Windows\system32>get-mailbox -filter { (RecipientTypeDetails -eq "UserMailbox") -and ( DisplayName -like "*confe
rence*") } | set-mailbox -type room
[PS] C:\Windows\system32>

Done! Now when you create an appointment in Outlook 2007, in Scheduling Assistant, you can click the “Add Room” button to add a room. Hooray.