Wake-on-LAN is so cool, when it works.

[evan@lunix ~]$ sudo -i
[root@lunix ~]# ether-wake -i eth2 00:1F:D0:D3:AE:9C
[root@lunix ~]# ping 192.168.1.79
PING 192.168.1.79 (192.168.1.79) 56(84) bytes of data.
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=2 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=3 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=4 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=6 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=7 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=8 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=10 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=11 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=12 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=14 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=15 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=16 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=18 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=19 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=20 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=22 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=23 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=24 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=26 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=27 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=28 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=30 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=31 Destination Host Unreachable
From 192.168.1.80 icmp_seq=32 Destination Host Unreachable
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=33 ttl=64 time=1001 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=34 ttl=64 time=1.26 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=35 ttl=64 time=0.193 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=36 ttl=64 time=0.194 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=37 ttl=64 time=0.175 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.79: icmp_seq=38 ttl=64 time=0.172 ms

--- 192.168.1.79 ping statistics ---
38 packets transmitted, 6 received, +24 errors, 84% packet loss, time 36994ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.172/167.184/1001.102/372.939 ms, pipe 3
[root@lunix ~]# logout
[evan@lunix ~]$ ssh 192.168.1.79
evan@192.168.1.79's password:
Last login: Tue Apr 12 17:30:58 2011 from 192.168.1.80
[evan@evanfc12 ~]$

Just saved me a trip downstairs!

Traffic spike

Somehow this site became the top Google result for two different searches, “Shogun2.dll appcrash” and “fedora 14 gnome3”. My theory is that Google’s indexing the referring keywords listed in the widget on the right, causing a snowball effect. But the rise in traffic this year has been dramatic, especially for a site really about nothing.

Traffic 2011-02-01 to 2011-04-08
Traffic 2011-02-01 to 2011-04-08

Can Fedora 14 users use Gnome 3?

Another influx of visitors searching for the answer to this question. I think this is probably coming from listing the referring keywords right on the page, and then Google indexing those. Anyway, to answer the question, apparently not, at least not via official RPMs:

Hi

GNOME 3 won’t be available as a update to Fedora 14. You can try the Fedora 15 Beta that is about to be released in a few days.

Perhaps not you wanted but you can try the Live CD at

http://gnome3.org/tryit.html
__________________
Rahul
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/RahulSundaram

Source: http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?p=1459175
Continue reading “Can Fedora 14 users use Gnome 3?”

Renaming a single-label domain to a FQDN

Long ago — eons, perhaps — before I had anything to do with the Windows environment here, someone created the AD domain in my company as a single-label domain (e.g. instead of “example.com” our domain is just “example”). Over the years this has led to lots of “fun” on the part of Windows admins who’ve worked here as the implications of this choice became more apparent.

Since I inherited this system about a year ago, I haven’t really bumped up against any problems stemming from the single-label domain issue… until now. I recently attempted to add a new Windows 2008r2 file server to our DFS replication group/namespace. This totally failed for some mysterious reason. Well, I shouldn’t say “totally” failed, as I was able to add it to the DFS replication group, but unable to add it to the DFS namespace. In my attempt to debug the namespace issue, I deleted the namespace and attempted to recreate it, but just kept getting this error: The namespace cannot be queried. The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted.. I couldn’t do anything with the namespace – even clicking on it in the DFS Management console brought up an error. After some searching I found that this was likely due to having a single-label domain. I wasn’t sure why the error was happening even on Windows 2003 machines though, maybe joining a 2008r2 box to the domain made some schema changes? I tried a few suggestions like editing the hosts file but nothing seemed to resolve this.

Fortunately, we didn’t really need DFS namespaces and were able to just direct everybody to the fileserver via its DNS name, though as you can imagine this was clumsy. However, since this has been a problem since time immemorial, I figured it was time to see if it was fixable. After some quick searching, I found RENDOM. However, after even more searching I discovered this TechNet article which says:

The domain rename operation is not supported in Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 or Exchange Server 2010. DNS domain rename is supported in Exchange Server 2003. However, renaming of the NetBIOS domain name is not supported in any version of Exchange Server. Other non-Microsoft applications might also not support domain rename.

Well. We’re running Exchange 2010. So now what? I guess we’re going to have to create a second domain and migrate over to it. We’d already discussed this as a likely way of implementing the rename anyway, since it didn’t seem like “RENDOM” had any rollback procedure – it either just works (hahaha) or semi-works and semi-fails, leaving a wake of destruction throughout AD. Building a second domain seems like a lot of work, but at least we can move users over one at a time, and we get the side benefit of starting fresh, outgrowing the 5+ years of crud that’s accumulated in our AD.

Guess we’ll see what happens. Neither option seems like much fun. I guess the alternative is do nothing, but Microsoft clearly doesn’t think very highly of single-label domains, and anyone who asks about them gets looked at funny. At least it gives us something to do!

My first trip to Walt Disney World – March 2011

Last week I returned from my first trip to Walt Disney World. We had a great time, and I figured it might be helpful to relay some of the things that helped make the trip better.

  • Walt Disney World with Kids 2011 – I had my doubts about this book but it had lots of good info for someone who’s never been to Disney World before, like which rides are best for kids. If you’ve never been to Disney World, this is worth reading. I didn’t know Fastpass existed until I read this.
  • Disney World Wait Times Free iPhone App – GPS-integrated iPhone app with wait times reported by other app users. Very helpful.
  • Disney’s own mobile phone site – Disney’s smartphone page. They have wait times here, but I found them to be pretty inaccurate. E.g. the page may say a wait time is “see now” (i.e. no wait) but there’s actually a 15 minute wait. However, this page was very useful for finding character locations and Fastpass availability.

The best tip for maximizing park enjoyment is to get there as early as possible. We got to Magic Kingdom at 8:30 AM, which was already kind of late compared to the book’s suggestion of arriving 30 minutes before the park opens, but the lines were pretty moderate and we got almost everything we wanted to do (Dumbo, race cars, Philharmagic, Buzz, a few others) done by noon and spent the rest of the day walking around exploring.

Update: I forgot to mention that if you stay at Disney’s resorts, there is no wifi internet. This was a big shock to us, since the hotels we stayed at on the way down (and up) all had free wifi. Disney’s resorts charge $10/day for internet access, which is available through a single ethernet port in each room. There are usually a couple of ethernet ports, but only one works for data (the phones use RJ45 connectors as well). This was pretty annoying because we had two computers and only one port, and the 3G signal in our room was pretty weak so I would have liked to connect my phone to wifi. If you want wifi at a Disney resort, I suggest bringing your own router. I’ve been having good luck with the TP-Link TL-WR841ND Wireless-N router, which Amazon usually has for under $40. I haven’t tried this at Disney so I can’t say for sure it works, but it’s worth a try if you want wireless.

Total War: Shogun 2 – shogun2.dll AppCrash

I’m noticing a bunch of hits referred by keyword search for “shogun2.dll appcrash.” Not sure how my site ended up in the SERPs for this keyword; I’ve never played Total War: Shogun 2 or written about it. But anyway, if you’re looking for info, try these URLs: