Single sign-on with Linux clients and Active Directory LDAP, Part 2

Following up on my previous post, it turned out not to be as big of a deal as I’d originally expected to have Apache authenticate against AD and only allow users whose accounts weren’t disabled. In a nutshell, here’s what I did:

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Single sign-on with Linux clients and Active Directory LDAP, Part 1

One project we’ve been working on for a while is single sign-on across all our servers and other services (e.g. SVN repository, a few other things). One thing I wanted to avoid, I guess for mostly religious reasons, was reliance on a Windows instance for any of our production environment. The logical part of my brain knows that people build huge websites with Windows farms and AD, but my gut still doesn’t trust it. So what I wanted to do was setup OpenLDAP as a “slave” to an Active Directory “master” and have all the LDAP info propagate over the slave whenever any changes were made in the master. I’ve done this with DNS – setup Bind as a slave to an AD server and everything basically works as I expect in a Bind-Bind master/slave scenario. Well, it turns out that it doesn’t work like that when it comes to LDAP. Apparently AD doesn’t follow the RFC for LDAP (surprise!) so many things that would be expected to work with OpenLDAP won’t.

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